Courses and Entry Requirements

Your choice of course at Post 16 is one of the most important decisions you will make in your life; it can help to determine your university, your career, your future. Below you will find videos from our fantastic Post 16 course leaders talking about what their subject involves and why you should choose it. Just click on any of the subjects below to find out more.

Entry Requirements

Post 16 study is demanding and we know how important it is for students to be placed on the right courses.

GENERAL ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

  • All students will need to provide an academic reference from a senior member of staff from the school that they are leaving.
  • Attendance and punctuality will be considered prior to offering students a place.
  • All students must meet the entry requirements stated in the list of courses on offer.

We offer a range of level 3 courses.

For A Levels, there is a general need for at least six GCSE (or equivalent) passes at grade 5 or higher, including English and Mathematics. 

For BTEC courses, at least five GCSE (or equivalent) passes at grade 4 or higher, preferably with at least two grade 5s or higher.

In addition, we can only offer a place on a specific subject if you achieve that subject’s entry requirements, which are detailed in the course descriptions below.

Certain subjects including Maths, Biology, Chemistry and Physics require a separate entrance test. Details of these entrance tests can be found when you apply online.

Please note subjects are available in certain option blocks on the timetable.

Courses

At Greenford, we have an outstanding and wide-ranging curriculum offer – you will find more details and specific entry requirements for individual subjects in the information below.

A-Level Courses

Biology

Why choose A Level Biology at Post 16?

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Entry Requirements

Grade 6+ in Science (separate or combined) &  Grade 6+ in Maths GCSE.

Course Content

Level: GCE A Level
Awarding Body: OCR

A level biology explores all aspects of the living world, looking at the subject at all levels ranging from:

  • the molecular -what molecules are living things built from, and how do these work together? 
  • The cellular -what are cells like, how do they function and how do we study them? 
  • The organism -what are the systems that are needed for complex plants and animals to function?
  • The ecological -how do different groups of organisms interact with each other?
  • At the same time biology is a practical subject that covers how scientific knowledge is produced as well as the specific technical skills that biologists use in research.

Year 1

  • Module 1: Development of Practical Skills in Biology
  • Module 2: Foundations in Biology
  • Module 3: Exchange and Transport
  • Module 4: Biodiversity, Evolution and Disease

Year 2

  • Module 5: Communication and Homeostasis
  • Module 6: Genetics, Evolution and Ecosystems

Assessment

As a two year course, all content will be assessed at the end of Year 13. Module 1 (Development of Practical skills in biology) will be assessed internally throughout the two years.

  • Paper 1: Biological processes - 37% of total A Level
  • Paper 2: Biological diversity - 37% of total A Level
  • Paper 3: Unified Biology - 26% of total A Level

Progression Routes

Biology can be used to gain entry to a variety of university courses, including degrees in the medical field, cellular biology, (genetics, microbiology, biochemistry) and environmental sciences.

University courses:

  • Medicine, Dentistry, veterinary sciences 
  • Biomedical science/ Biochemistry/ Pharmacy/ optometry
  • Biology

Future careers

  • Medicine/ dentistry/ veterinary medicine/ pharmacy/ optometry
  • Life science research
  • Environmental scientist/ conservation

Curriculum Intent

What is Greenford High aiming to achieve through its Science curriculum?

At Greenford High School the Science curriculum is designed to foster a curiosity about the world around us, enable citizens of the future to understand and explore the world effectively and to be able to use scientific principles to both answer and ask questions about the universe and everything in it.

Our intent is that our curriculum:

  • inspires a love of learning and curiosity about the world
  • ensures students understand the second greatest advance in the history of humanity – the scientific method – and can apply this process to questions they might ask
  • develops the practical knowledge and skills to use scientific equipment safely and accurately to competently test ideas and demonstrate phenomena
  • fosters a sense of awe in the beauty of our universe and how we can work together (or individually) to deepen our understanding of ANYTHING
  • informs knowledge of the key workings of the human body so that educated opinions and decisions can be made about health, products and stories in the media
  • develops analytical skills to scrutinise data presented in any format to draw out meaning
  • combines basic Maths and English skills in context to help students develop their application skills
  • informs students of issues facing themselves and the wider world to help this future generation look after themselves and their planet
  • ensures students leave GHS able to critically analyse and evaluate data, stories and phenomena in everyday situations
  • improves transferable skills such as time-keeping, teamwork and organisation
  • develops students learning skills and independence so they can go on to be life-long learners
  • makes students more employable so they become a self-sufficient and productive member of society
  • delivers opportunities to apply the skills learnt in the form of a wide range of practicals
  • helps students develop logical thinking and problem solving skills
  • teaches students how to be safe and evaluate risks in everyday life and in particular scientific contexts

Business Studies

Why A Level Business Studies at Post 16?

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Entry Requirements

Grade 5+ in English and Maths GCSEs.

Course Content

Level: GCE A Level
Awarding Body: Edexcel

The aim of the course is to analyse how businesses operate, outline the problems businesses face and recommend how businesses can overcome these problems. An understanding of key business concepts and theories underpins all the work that is done at A Level.

3 Papers in total:

Paper 1 (Themes 1 and 4): Marketing, People and Global Business

  • Total marks: 100 marks.
  • Weighting: 35%
  • Exam time: 2 hours
  • There are 2 sections A and B and ALL questions must be answered and are based on stimulus material.

Paper 2 (Themes 2 and 4): Business Activities, Decisions and Strategy

  • Total marks: 100 marks.
  • Weighting: 35%
  • Exam time: 2 hours
  • There are 2 sections A and B and ALL questions must be answered and are based on stimulus material.

Paper 3: Investigating Business in a Competitive Environment

  • Total marks: 100 marks.
  • Weighting: 30%
  • Exam time: 2 hours
  • Pre-release case study of broad context will be issued in November of the previous year with questions drawn from all themes

Year 1 

  • Theme 1 : Marketing and People
  • Theme 2: Managing Business Activities

Year 2

  • Theme 3: Business Decision and Strategy
  • Theme 4 : Global Business

Assessment

  • Paper 1 (2 hour written paper) – Theme 1 and 3  (35%)
  • Paper 2 (2 hour written paper) -  Theme 2 and 4  (35%)
  • Paper 3 (2 hours)  Investigating business in a competitive environment  (synoptic)  - based on a pre-released case study  (30%)

Progression Routes

The full A Level in Business Studies is a useful introduction to study a variety of courses at university. A very large number of Greenford students go on to study Business or related subjects at degree level.

University courses:

  • Business Management
  • Marketing
  • Accounting and Finance
  • Business

Future careers:

  • Marketing
  • Finance
  • Business Management

Curriculum Intent

What is Greenford High School aiming to achieve through its Business and Economics curriculum?

  • To develop students’ awareness and natural curiosity of the Business and Economic environment around them and to raise awareness of economic and business developments in the UK and around the world.
  • To offer opportunities for students to engage in activities that allow them to develop their self-confidence, employability and enterprise skills. 
  • To promote moral, social and cultural responsibility through the real world nature of the subject via topics such as business ethics, social costs and globalisation. 
  • To encourage students to become effective and independent learners, as well as being critical and reflective thinkers with enquiring minds.
  • To enable students’ to build upon their business and economics knowledge and skills and apply them appropriately to produce successful outcomes. 
  • To offer a broad curriculum within the department to make the subject offering comprehensive and accessible. 
  • To prepare students for the next stage of their education, future pathways and careers through developing their skills and attributes and providing opportunities and experiences to inspire them to succeed.

chemistry

Why choose A level Chemistry at Post 16

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Entry Requirements

Grade 6+ in Science (separate or combined) &  Grade 6+ in Maths GCSE.

Course Content

Level: GCE A Level
Awarding Body: OCR

Chemistry will teach students about the world around them, from tiny electrons to the chemistry of manufacturing on an industrial scale. Pupils will need strong mathematical skills which will be used to calculate values, predict the outcome of reactions and represent quantities which we cannot physically see in order to explain the real world properties of materials based on their interactions at an atomic level.

Chemistry students will follow the OCR Chemistry A specification. The first term will introduce pupils to a more developed model of the atom than they have studied at GCSE level. This will enable them to understand bonding and explain the patterns and trends in the properties of elements within the periodic table. Students will then move on to study more complex situations and ideas which build upon the basics learnt in the first unit. Throughout the year students will be required to carry out practical tasks which will allow them to evaluate their methods and the risks involved, to record data to appropriate levels of precision and interpret the data they record.

Year 1                               

  • Module 1: Development of Practical skills in chemistry
  • Module 2: Foundations in chemistry   
  • Module 3: Periodic table and energy
  • Module 4: Core organic chemistry

Year 2

  • Module 1: Development of Practical skills in chemistry
  • Module 5: Physical chemistry and transition elements
  • Module 6: Organic chemistry and analysis

Assessment

As a two year course, all content will be assessed at the end of year 13. Module 1 (Development of Practical skills in chemistry) will be assessed internally throughout the two years.

Paper 1: Periodic table, elements and physical chemistry
37% of total A Level

Paper 2: Synthesis and analytical techniques
37% of total A Level

Paper 3: Unified chemistry
26% of total A Level

Progression Routes

University courses:

  • Medicine, Dentistry, veterinary sciences (Chemistry A Level is a requirement for these courses)
  • Chemical engineering
  • Biochemistry or Natural sciences 

Future careers:

  • Pharmaceuticals, Lab work, Forensic science
  • Nuclear industry
  • Nursing, physiotherapy, optometry, psychiatry

Curriculum Intent

What is Greenford High aiming to achieve through its Science curriculum?

At Greenford High School the Science curriculum is designed to foster a curiosity about the world around us, enable citizens of the future to understand and explore the world effectively and to be able to use scientific principles to both answer and ask questions about the universe and everything in it.

Our intent is that our curriculum:

  • inspires a love of learning and curiosity about the world
  • ensures students understand the second greatest advance in the history of humanity – the scientific method – and can apply this process to questions they might ask
  • develops the practical knowledge and skills to use scientific equipment safely and accurately to competently test ideas and demonstrate phenomena
  • fosters a sense of awe in the beauty of our universe and how we can work together (or individually) to deepen our understanding of ANYTHING
  • informs knowledge of the key workings of the human body so that educated opinions and decisions can be made about health, products and stories in the media
  • develops analytical skills to scrutinise data presented in any format to draw out meaning
  • combines basic Maths and English skills in context to help students develop their application skills
  • informs students of issues facing themselves and the wider world to help this future generation look after themselves and their planet
  • ensures students leave GHS able to critically analyse and evaluate data, stories and phenomena in everyday situations
  • improves transferable skills such as time-keeping, teamwork and organisation
  • develops students learning skills and independence so they can go on to be life-long learners
  • makes students more employable so they become a self-sufficient and productive member of society
  • delivers opportunities to apply the skills learnt in the form of a wide range of practicals
  • helps students develop logical thinking and problem solving skills
  • teaches students how to be safe and evaluate risks in everyday life and in particular scientific contexts

computer Science

Why choose A Level Computer Science at post 16?

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Entry Requirements

Grade 6+ in Maths GCSE.

Course Content

Level: GCE A Level
Awarding Body: AQA

Computer Science is an academic subject where students can apply theoretical principles in solving practical and real-world problems. It is an intensely creative subject that combines innovation and imagination, and can look at the natural world through a digital prism. The aims of this qualification are to enable learners to develop:

  • An understanding and ability to apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including: abstraction, decomposition, logic, algorithms and data representation
  • The ability to analyse problems in computational terms through practical experience of solving such problems by developing program
  • The capacity to think creatively, innovatively, analytically, logically and critically
  • The capacity to see relationships between different aspects of computer science
  • Mathematical skills.

Assessment

Paper 1

What's assessed: this paper tests a student's ability to program, as well as their theoretical knowledge of Computer Science from subject content 10-13 above and the skills required from section 22 above.

Assessment

  • On-screen exam: 2 hours 30 minutes
  • 40% of A-level

Questions

Students answer a series of short questions and write/adapt/extend programs in an Electronic Answer Document provided by us.

We will issue Preliminary Material, a Skeleton Program (available in each of the Programming Languages) and, where appropriate, test data, for use in the exam.

Paper 2

What's assessed: this paper tests a student's ability to answer questions from subject content 14-21 above.

Assessment

  • Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes
  • 40% of A-level

Questions

Compulsory short-answer and extended-answer questions.

Non-exam Assessment

What's assessed: the non-exam assessment assesses a student's ability to use the knowledge and skills gained through the course to solve or investigate a practical problem. Students will be expected to follow a systematic approach to problem solving, as shown in section 22 above.

Assessment

  • 75 marks
  • 20% of A-level

Progression Routes

Computer Science provides a good foundation for careers in Engineering, Software development, Robotics, Data Science, Finance, Cyber Security and many others including medical sciences.

Curriculum Intent

What is Greenford High School aiming to achieve through its Computing and Information Technology curriculum?

  • To build a computing curriculum that develops pupil’s learning and results in the acquisition of knowledge of the digital world around them, that prepares pupils to live safely in an increasingly digital British society.
  • Develop learners' knowledge, skills and understanding through key computational concepts and experience. So that they will become confident and robust problem solvers and understand how to better use computers as a tool, a tool that can be configured and reconfigured to solve any number of problems that face us now and that will face us further into the future.
  • The KS3 curriculum has been designed to ensure learners have sufficient knowledge to stay safe online and use computers safely in life. 
  • The KS3 curriculum also provides a focus on developing resilient learners who think in a more logical way, are able to recover from mistakes and effectively solve problems.  
  • The rationale of the KS4 curriculum is for students to develop the mind-set of a computer scientist built upon the foundations at KS3 and to build upon at KS5
  • Learners to have the opportunity to develop their capability, creativity and knowledge in computer science, digital media and information technology.
  • Computer Science will develop skills in programming, problem solving and analytical thinking. This qualification provides students with a range of transferable skills
  • Students will develop their knowledge and understanding of computer technology to become independent and discerning Computer Scientists, who are able to make informed decisions about its use while being aware of the implications of different technologies.
  • We want students to not only understand how to use technology effectively and responsibly but also how technology is developed and constantly redeveloped into new and exciting tools.

DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY - PRODUCT DESIGN
 

Why choose A Level product design at post 16?

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Entry Requirements

Grade 5+ in Science (separate or combined) & Grade 5+ in Design & Technology GCSE.

Course Content and assessment

Level: GCE A Level
Awarding Body: Edexcel

Equipping students with design skills for the future: Students will be able to recognise design needs and develop an understanding of how current global issues, including integrating technology, impacts on today’s world.

Encourages creativity and innovation: At A Level students will have the confidence to innovate and produce creative design solutions as they develop their own design brief with a client/end user.

Component 1: Principles of Design and Technology (Paper code: 9DT0/01)

Written examination: 2 hours 30 minutes 50% of the qualification 120 marks

Assessment Overview

The paper includes calculations, short-open and open-response questions. as well as extended-writing questions focused on:

  • Analysis and evaluation of design decisions and outcomes, against a technical principle, for prototypes made by others
  • Analysis and evaluation of wider issues in design technology, including social, moral, ethical and environmental impacts.

Component 2: Independent Design and Make Project (Paper code: 9DT0/02)

Non-examined assessment 50% of the qualification 120 marks

Assessment Overview

  • The investigation report is internally assessed and externally moderated.
  • Students will produce a substantial design, make and evaluate project which consists of a portfolio and a prototype

Progression Routes

Students can continue on to:

  • Design degrees - Product, Graphic, Interior, and Architecture at Brunel, Nottingham, Leeds, Bristol. 
  • Design Engineering at Imperial College, Nottingham. 
  • Mechanical Engineering at Queen Mary, Bath, Bristol.
  • Electrical Engineering at Bath, Bristol, Manchester, Surrey.  
  • Aeronautical Engineering at Cambridge, City, Imperial, Bristol. 
  • Material Sciences at Cambridge, Southampton. 

Some students may choose to progress onto a one year Art & Design foundation course locally to assist them in choosing the right degree course for them. Foundation courses are broad and varied and range from graphic design to product design, fashion & textiles and illustration, ceramics and photography.

Curriculum Intent

What is Greenford High School aiming to achieve through its Design & Technology curriculum?

  • To build up creativity, problem solving, planning, practical and evaluation skills to become independent and resourceful. 
  • To develop Health and Safety awareness in their working environment and surroundings to keep students safe
  • To develop the students understanding of the huge, life-changing role and impact a designer can have through the use of real world problems and value what is ‘good design’ and how it will impact their future lives
  • To foster a culture of ‘design critique’ to produce quality outcomes via peer and group work, respecting other students’ opinions
  • To become moral, social, responsible designers and design to aid comfort, transport, physical needs, communication, health and also for aesthetic reasons to make a positive contribution to society
  • To develop resilience when understanding  the developments in design and technology, its impact and effect of products on individuals, society and the environment, and the responsibilities of designers, engineers and technologists
  • To learn the basics of nutrition and a healthy balanced diet, understand where the food we eat comes from, be able to make informed healthy choices and enjoy the cultural diversity of dishes that International cuisine offers
  • To acquire relevant knowledge from other subjects and apply them to produce successful outcomes
  • To prepare pupils for the next stage of their education, future pathways and careers through developing the skills and attributes required for success both at school and in the workplace

Economics

Why choose A Level economics at post 16?

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Entry Requirements

Entry Requirements: Grade 6+ in Maths and English Language GCSE.

Course Content

Level: GCE A Level
Awarding Body: OCR

Economics uses theories and evidence to explain current and past economic issues. It also discusses the policy options a government has to solve economic problems. The course provides an overview of the economy and the important institutions within it.

The course covers topics such as Unemployment, Inflation, Economic Growth, The Minimum Wage, International Trade, Globalisation and Monopoly Power. It also analyses the economic decisions faced by businesses and individuals.

A Level Economics is divided into two sections:

Microeconomics - Students will discuss and evaluate how well microeconomic theories explain the behaviour of economic agents in the real world. They will develop an understanding of markets, market structures and business objectives. Students will learn how to use and interpret quantitative evidence to justify economic decisions as well as to critically reflect on the limitations of data. They are encouraged to consider the moral, ethical and sustainability issues that arise as a result of economic activity in a range of national and global contexts.

Macroeconomics - Students will learn how macroeconomics functions on both a domestic and global level and develop an understanding of the objectives, limitations and conflicts of macroeconomic policies. Students will use, interpret and evaluate quantitative evidence in contemporary and historical economic contexts. They will learn to appreciate the importance and impact of international trade, globalisation and the role of financial markets. Students are encouraged to consider moral, ethical and sustainability issues that arise as a result of economic activity in a range of national and global contexts.

Assessment

The course is assessed with three exams. One focuses on microeconomics, one focuses on macroeconomics and one that combines micro and macro.

  • Paper 1 (2 hour written paper) - Micro - 80 marks - 33.33%
  • Paper 2 (2 hour written paper) - Macro - 80 marks - 33.33%
  • Paper 3 (2 hours) - Theme - 80 marks (students will draw together their knowledge and skills to answer questions from across all content areas) - 33.34%

Progression Routes

An A Level in Economics is a strong foundation to study any course at university. A large and growing number of students continue to study Economics at university.

University courses:

  • Economics
  • Accounting
  • Finance
  • Business

Future careers:

  • Economics
  • Accountant 
  • Banking and finance

Curriculum Intent

What is Greenford High School aiming to achieve through its Business and Economics curriculum?

  • To develop students’ awareness and natural curiosity of the Business and Economic environment around them and to raise awareness of economic and business developments in the UK and around the world.
  • To offer opportunities for students to engage in activities that allow them to develop their self-confidence, employability and enterprise skills. 
  • To promote moral, social and cultural responsibility through the real world nature of the subject via topics such as business ethics, social costs and globalisation. 
  • To encourage students to become effective and independent learners, as well as being critical and reflective thinkers with enquiring minds.
  • To enable students’ to build upon their business and economics knowledge and skills and apply them appropriately to produce successful outcomes. 
  • To offer a broad curriculum within the department to make the subject offering comprehensive and accessible. 
  • To prepare students for the next stage of their education, future pathways and careers through developing their skills and attributes and providing opportunities and experiences to inspire them to succeed.

English Literature

Why choose a level English literature at post 16?

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Entry Requirements

Grade 6+ in English Language or Literature GCSE.

Course Content

Level: GCE A Level
Awarding Body: Edexcel

English Literature A Level offers students the opportunity to discuss and debate key themes, characters and ideas in classic literary works. This course includes some pre-twentieth century literature as well as more modern texts. Students will be required to think critically about what they have looked at, and to develop skills in evaluating texts. These are all extremely transferable skills, which makes English Literature highly regarded by universities and colleges and the perfect complement to other analytical subjects at A Level.

English Literature involves the study of poetry, prose and drama from a range of periods. Texts currently being studied include: A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams; Othello by Shakespeare, The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde, Beloved by Toni Morrison and poetry by John Keats. Students sit three exams worth in total 80% of their grade and write one coursework essay that makes up 20% of the final grade with the opportunity to write about texts of their own choice. Lessons are based on discussion to develop analytical skills, with wider reading strongly encouraged. We also offer theatre visits and the opportunity to work with the National Theatre on your own, one-act play.

Year 1

  • Unit 1 Drama, Section A  -- William Shakespeare’s Othello
  • Unit 2 Prose - Toni Morrison’s Beloved and Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray OR Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale and Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein
  • Unit 3 Poetry, Section A - Modern Poetry (Poems of the Decade) - comparison with an unseen poem
  • Unit 4: Coursework - F Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby (subject to change)

Year 2

  • Unit 1 Drama, Section B - Tennessee Williams’s A Streetcar Named Desire
  • Unit 3 Poetry, Section B - selected poems of John Keats

Assessment

  • Unit 1 Drama - exam (30% of final grade)
  • Unit 2 Prose - exam (20% of final grade)
  • Unit 3 Poetry - exam (30% of final grade)
  • Unit 4 Coursework - centre-assessed (20% of final grade) 

Progression Routes

University courses:

  • English Literature
  • Law
  • History
  • Economics
  • Medicine
  • Marketing
  • Creative Writing

Future careers:

  • Lawyer
  • Publishing
  • Journalism
  • Creative Industries
  • Marketing and Advertising

Curriculum intent

What is Greenford High School aiming to achieve through its English curriculum?

  • The English department takes an active role in nurturing students who are passionate about literature and communicate with confidence; in lessons students are inspired by great works of literature and are encouraged to find their own creative voice.
  • To provide a breadth of study where students are well-read and able to explore a range of texts that develop wider cultural context so that they are more worldly in their knowledge.
  • To provide opportunities for students to explore topics that allow them to develop resilience, empathy, an appreciation for others’ ideas/ contributions, and an open mindedness in regards to equal opportunities, mental health, discrimination, etc.

Extended Project Qualification

Entry Requirements

You will be invited to complete this by November of Year 13.

Course Content

Level: GCE A Level
Awarding Body: AQA

Learners have a significant input into the choice and design of their extended project and take responsibility either for an individual task or for a defined task within a group project. The project will allow students to develop and improve their own learning and performance as critical, reflective and independent learners. Alongside developing and applying decision making and, where appropriate, problem solving skills. The project is also designed to extend planning, research, critical thinking, analysis, synthesis, evaluation and presentation skills. The Extended Project is highly regarded by all universities and therefore can help to support student aspirations for higher education and career development.

How is it Taught?

This is an independent piece of research. You will meet with a member of staff (supervisor) on a regular basis in order to discuss your progress. The purpose of working closely with a mentor is to offer guidance and support. They may also offer invaluable advice as regards the tools to effectively manage a project of this nature. However there is a limited taught element to the qualification. The project can take many forms including:

  • A piece of extended writing consisting of 5000 words
  • A media production
  • Organising an event
  • Producing an artefact (such as a piece of artwork or a portfolio of photographs)
  • A group activity, whereby each member of the group is given a specific role
  • Where the product involves the production of an artefact or something similar, a 1000 word piece of writing still needs to be included

Progression Routes

The qualification is an AS level. However, students can gain an A* which is not usually the case with AS qualifications. All universities recognise the qualification, with some offering lower entry grades if students achieve a certain level.

Fine Art & photography

Why choose a level art or photography at post 16?

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Entry Requirements

Grade 5+ in Art GCSE.

Course Content

Level: GCE A Level
Awarding Body: Edexcel

The A Level Fine Art & Photography courses are divided into two key components over two years: component 1 and an externally set exam = component 2. 

Year 1

We aim to give students a wide range of experiences and opportunities, and are keen to encourage the development of strong personal qualities in each student's artwork and chosen media. Before embarking on their assessable coursework, students begin the first year by completing a short ‘art foundation studies’ course which develops their handling of a wide variety of art materials, encourages experimentalism, builds technical skill and confidence. These projects serve to equip them with a basic ‘toolbox’ of skills which can be developed and refined in subsequent coursework. 

Within GCSE Fine Art and GCSE Photography (coursework 60% of the final grade, exam 40% of the final grade) students will:

  • Explore ideas & concepts behind artists’ work, when specialising in drawing, painting, printmaking and digital photography.
  • Visit galleries and exhibitions, enabling students to learn from the work of others and making connections with their own work and past/contemporary practices.
  • To show progress through a variety of outcomes and supporting studies. The latest could be in the shape of sketchbooks, notebooks, worksheets, sculpture.

In order to fulfil the demands of the course, students are required to come into the studio during their independent learning time/afterschool to complete coursework. Students will be given full support both in and out of set lesson time. 

Year 2

Component 2: 40%

This component starts in February of the second year and finishes in April/May.
This assignment is set externally by Edexcel. A final practical exam of 15 hours (three full school days) is supported by a number of weeks’ preparation work in sketchbooks which takes place in the art studio and at home.

Assessment

Component 1, worth 60% of the overall grade is set internally, students select their own theme to study. This component is comprised of a portfolio/sketchbook of development work, a final outcome and ‘personal study’ (1500-3000 word essay). This takes place between Nov in year 1 until late Jan in year 2.

Component 2 is an externally set exam & theme, worth 40% of the overall grade. This is comprised of a sketchbook/portfolio of development work and a final outcome.
The overall art grade is based on all work produced for components 1 & 2 over the two-year course and is marked holistically by their teacher and then moderated within the department. Work from both components is finally assessed in school by an external moderator from the exam board.

Progression Routes

A level Art or Photography leads to many exciting pathways for study at University and Art College and can lead to a wide variety of careers.

University courses:

  • Art Foundation (Advised - 1 year course pre-degree)
  • Central St Martins
  • Wimbledon School of Art
  • Bristol UWE
  • Glasgow School of Art
  • University of Kingston
  • Falmouth College of the Arts

Future careers:

  • Art Teacher
  • Art Therapist
  • Art Director
  • Art Critic
  • Art Historian
  • Gallery Curator
  • Art Historian
  • Fine Artist
  • Photographer
  • Fashion designer
  • Architect
  • Animator
  • Film Set Designer
  • Cinematographer
  • Illustrator
  • Graphic Artist 

Curriculum Intent

What is Greenford High School aiming to achieve through its Art curriculum?

  • To enable students to develop an understanding and awareness of the world around them by questioning their surroundings, looking deeply and opening their eyes to fresh perspectives
  • To develop an awareness of health and safety within an art studio environment and to take responsibility for managing the materials they use
  • To develop and apply art skills such as drawing, painting and sculpting and artistic techniques to communicate an idea and analyse the effectiveness of own art work 
  • To be creative and develop their ability to problem solve, think academically, emotionally, physically and spiritually. They will learn to adopt resilience and focus in applying their technical skills to projects that develop their self-expression 
  • To respond imaginatively to artist and thematic research and use knowledge of key artists and cultures to inspire their art work. Students develop an understanding of the historical and cultural development of art forms and are taught to evaluate and analyse artworks using subject-specific vocabulary
  • To plan and develop meaningful responses for their art work that realises intentions and demonstrates an understanding of visual language
  • To display creative expression which leads to improved well-being, and support their study experience. The study of other cultures through Art has strong links with Religious Education, History, English, and Media. 

French

Why choose a level french at post 16?

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Entry Requirements

Grade 6+ in French GCSE.

Course Content

Level: GCE A Level
Awarding Body: Edexcel

Students will learn to discuss a range of topics in the language they are studying. These will include Social Issues and Trends and Political and Artistic Culture as well as an in-depth study of a book and a film. Students will have access to a wide-range of authentic materials such as video, online resources, newspapers and magazines and have the opportunity to take part in weekly conversation sessions with a Foreign Language Assistant.

The main focus is on developing the knowledge and skills acquired at GCSE, encouraging accuracy through a solid understanding of grammar and gaining a useful insight into the culture of the target language country. Speaking skills are developed in lessons and in sessions with the language assistant. Through the topics studied, students will get the opportunity to reflect on various aspects of contemporary society including the changing role of the family, equal rights, life for the marginalised, cultural heritage, politics and immigration. All students will be given the chance to take part in a week's work experience in a country where the language is spoken.

Assessment

A Level French is a two-year linear course with exams at the end of Year 13.

  • Paper 1: Listening, Reading & Translation (40%)
  • Paper 2: Written response to works and translation (30%)
  • Paper 3: Speaking (30%)

Progression Routes

By choosing to study a foreign language at A-Level, you immediately enhance your UCAS and employment prospects. It is an extremely flexible subject which combines well with both Arts, Sciences and Business based subjects. Most universities offer courses that allow you to combine the study of a language alongside a wide variety of other subjects and most of these courses will offer the opportunity for a year abroad studying or working. In its guidance to applicants, Russell Group universities recommend languages as a 'facilitating' subject at A Level because choosing languages "leaves open a wide range of options for university studies".

Curriculum Intent

What is Greenford High School aiming to achieve through its French curriculum?

  • To develop understanding of spoken and written language from a variety of authentic sources. (listening / reading)
  • To increase opportunities for spontaneous speech in order to build confidence, fluency and spontaneity when communicating. (speaking)
  • To produce written responses at varying length, for different purposes and audiences, using variety of grammatical structures. (writing)
  • To make use of appropriate social conventions, including informal and formal address and register. (register)
  • To foster curiosity, develop awareness and understanding of the culture and identity of the countries or communities where the language is spoken. (intercultural)
  • To foster links with other curriculum areas to deepen learning and encourage bilingualism. (cross-curricular)
  • To develop resilient and independent learners in order to maximise their progress and prepare them for the next stage in their education irrespective of their attainment and background. (further education)
  • To provide enrichment opportunities to foster responsible global citizens who would positively contribute to society. (enrichment)  
  • To encourage a creative approach to language learning and instilling students with a growth mindset. (creativity)  

Further Mathematics

Why choose a level further mathematics at post 16?

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Entry Requirements

Grade 7+ in Maths GCSE

Course Content

Level: GCE A Level
Awarding Body: Edexcel

Further Mathematics will give you the opportunity to deepen your knowledge and understanding of many of the topics covered in A Level Mathematics. Additionally, some completely new topics will be studied, such as complex numbers and matrices.

  • Year 12: A Level Mathematics (an A Level in one year) along the Year 12 part of Core Pure 1 and some Further Statistics and Further Mechanics.
  • Year 13: Core Pure, Further Pure 1, Further Mechanics 1 and Further Statistics 1.

What are the modules?

Core Pure Mathematics 1 and 2 are compulsory modules that cover pure Mathematics content that doesn’t fit into the Pure section of the A Level Mathematics, but is nevertheless fundamental to modern Mathematics, Physics and Engineering. For example, you will learn about Complex Numbers and Matrices. On the other hand, certain aspects of the Pure Mathematics curriculum are further extended, such as Vectors and especially Calculus (integration and differentiation).

The course also requires two optional units to be chosen. At Greenford High School, we teach three options modules, Further Mechanics, Further Statistics, and Further Pure 1. This is to give students as solid a foundation as possible in the three areas of Mathematics that they will be studying over the two years in both Mathematics and Further Mathematics: Pure, Mechanics and Statistics. Students can then sit papers in all three modules, with the exam board choosing the best combination to maximise the students’ grades. Alternatively students can choose to only sit the two modules they feel most confident in.

Assessment

As a two year course, all content will be assessed at the end of year 13. 

  • Paper 1: Core Pure Mathematics (25% of total A Level)
  • Paper 2: Core Pure Mathematics (25% of total A Level)
  • Paper 3: Further Statistics/Further Mechanics/Further Pure 1 (25% of total A Level)
  • Paper 4: Further Statistics/Further Mechanics/Further Pure 1 (25% of total A Level)

Progression Routes

Further Mathematics is essential or highly recommended for anyone wanting to study Mathematics, Physics or Engineering at a top university. The level of mathematical demand in these subjects is so high that anyone who has not done Further Mathematics would be at a significant disadvantage from the very start of their course. Further Mathematics may also be useful to Computer Science and Economics students.

Curriculum Intent 

What is Greenford High School aiming to achieve through its Mathematics curriculum?

  • To develop a passion for mathematics for students to continue throughout their school life and beyond, whilst building curiosity about the mathematics around us and ask about ‘why’ and ‘how’ concepts arise.
  • To reason mathematically through lines of enquiry, conjecturing relationships and generalisations, developing arguments through justifications and proof using mathematical language.
  • To become fluent with the fundamentals of mathematics, through varied, frequent practice and increasingly complex concepts over time, so that students can develop conceptual understanding and the ability to recall and apply knowledge rapidly and accurately.
  • To be able to problem solve by applying mathematics to a variety of routine and non-routine problems, with increasing sophistication. Breaking down problems into a series of simpler steps and persevering in seeking solutions in order to promote independence, resilience and perseverance through rich-tasks. 
  • To build on the mathematics that has been taught previously to enable students to master key skills and make rapid progress.
  • To be inclusive and meet all students’ needs to ensure that all learners are able to access the curriculum and achieve,  but also to challenge and engage the most able students, encouraging them to study Maths and related courses beyond GCSE and A Level , at University and through their career ambitions.
  • To be able to be self-sufficient in managing their personal finances beyond secondary school.
  • To develop teamwork and leadership skills through ‘Maths talk’.
  • To foster a culture where the most able students act as mentors for younger students encouraging a real sense of a Maths community in school.
  • To cultivate an enthusiasm for Maths, and develop application skills, through relevant and related trips and extra-curricular activities.

Geography

Why choose a level geography at post 16?

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Entry Requirements

Grade 6+ in Geography GCSE

Course Content

Level: GCE A Level
Awarding Body: Edexcel

Geographers engage critically with real world issues and places, they apply their geographical knowledge, theory and skills to the world around them. Geography students will grow as independent thinkers and as informed and engaged citizens, who understand the role and importance of Geography as one of the key disciplines relevant to understanding the world’s changing peoples, places and environments. 

Geography A-Level takes a contemporary, issues-based approach which focuses on fundamental processes and environments, but also reflects the world around us. You will explore and evaluate a range of geographical questions and issues such as the consequences of globalisation (and a ‘shrinking world’), responses to hazards (including hurricanes and volcanoes), the issue of water insecurity (including the idea that we will fight wars over water in the future), and the mitigation of and future solutions to climate change. 

Year 1

The course consists of both physical and human units. In the first year we investigate the human topics of Regenerating Places, Globalisation, and Superpowers alongside the physical topics of Coastal Landscapes and Change and The Water Cycle and Water Insecurity.  The course looks at players involved in decision making, different attitudes and actions of individuals, government and corporations as well as the futures and uncertainties of these geographical issues.

Key questions you will study include:

  • How do human activities exacerbate flood risk?  
  • What are the pros and cons of hard engineering schemes like mega dams? 
  • Which countries have increasing geopolitical influence and why?  
  • Who will be the global powerhouses in 2050?
  • Do we live in a shrinking world? 
  • Who are the winners and losers in a globalised world? 
  • What constitutes successful regeneration in Southall? 
  • Which areas of the world may disappear from coastal flooding?  
  • How can the UK survive increasing sea level rise? 

Year 2

In the second year, topics include Health, Human Rights and Intervention, The Carbon Cycle and Carbon Insecurity and Tectonic Processes and Hazards.  Students are also required to carry out a minimum of four days of fieldwork in order to write an NEA (non-examined assessment). This involves a residential trip to a contrasting area of the UK.  This is a piece of coursework where students define a question or issue relating to one part of the course they have studied. The NEA will include presentation of data findings,  independent analysis and evaluation of data.

Key questions you will study include:

  • Why do human rights vary from place to place? 
  • Are human rights issues an argument in favour of military intervention?
  • How can we mitigate volcanic hazards?  
  • How do places adapt to volcanic activity? 
  • What are the natural causes of a warming climate?  
  • How can places adapt to a warming climate? 

Assessment

  • Paper 1: 30%:  2hr 15min  Examination:  Physical Topics
  • Paper 2: 30%:  2hr 15min  Examination:  Human Topics
  • Paper 3: 20%:  2hr 15min  Examination:  Synoptic Paper (resource booklet)
  • NEA: 20%: Coursework

Progression Routes

Geography is a highly respected, academic A-level.  It is a strong 'facilitating' subject which is widely seen as a good choice for students who want to keep their degree options flexible. It facilitates pathways onto multiple degree areas. As an excellent course, with many cross curricular links, good geographers can access courses in Law, Medicine, Business, Sciences, Management, Governance and many other areas. 

Geography graduates entering employment are highly represented in the commercial, industrial and public sector management categories. They are also well represented in business and financial professions and in marketing, sales and advertising.

Unemployment rates for Geography graduates are amongst the lowest of all degree disciplines. You can find out more about the careers Geography can lead to here or see a range of jobs linked to Geography here.

Curriculum Intent

What is Greenford High School aiming to achieve through its Geography curriculum?

  • Empower students to have a rounded view of a variety of current issues to enable them to understand what is going on in the globalising world around them.
  • Provide a balanced viewpoint on global, national and local issues.
  • Develop a wide range of literacy, numeracy and map skills which will be applicable throughout their education and also in wider life.
  • Create a conscientious student body that are aware of how humans can impact upon natural physical processes and our wider environment.
  • Encourage students to be reflective of hazards which happen locally and in the wider world and understand the causes, impacts and responses to a variety of global hazards.
  • Ensure that students’ knowledge about the UK, and the issues currently facing the country, and issues which may be increasingly problematic in the future is up to date.
  • Provide opportunity for students to be optimistic and critical about the future and problem solve global issues.
  • Encourage students to know their local area, how it has changes over time and the plans for future change including the contrasting opinions of different stakeholders to this change.
  • Provide opportunities to learn outside the classroom, and outside of their comfort zone, in their local area, other UK areas and abroad.

GERMAN 

A Level German will run if there is sufficient student demand. Please contact us for further details on the course.

Government & Politics

Why choose Government & Politics at Post 16?

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Entry Requirements

Grade 6+ in Geography or History GCSE.

Course Content

Level: GCE A Level
Awarding Body: Edexcel

Government and Politics offers students a dynamic A Level course which is a highly regarded qualification to study a degree in Law, any Social Science or related Humanities degree. The Year 1 course focuses on the way in which British democracy has evolved, how the country is governed and ways in which the rights of citizens are preserved. Students develop an awareness of the political issues that have shaped modern Britain and the current affairs that influence the present political debates including protests against tuition fees and the decisions of the Coalition. The course offers trips to the House of Commons and regularly invites guest speakers to the school. The Year 2 course looks at the US political system, how Presidents are elected and key political issues that are important to the US and the wider world. There is no coursework. The A Level is made up of four units tested over both years.

Year 1:

In Year 1 Students study representation in the UK, governing the UK and the changing UK political system. This will involve looking at British Political Parties and pressure groups, in particular their origins and impact. This is followed by examining the ideas of democracy, voting patterns and behaviour as well as different systems of electing representatives of the people and the impact on the European Union on UK politics.

Year 2:

Year 2 allows students to study US government and politics with an opportunity of comparing the US political system with the UK political system.

Assessment

Three papers, each two hours in length, on UK and US politics all equally weighted. 

Progression Routes

Government and Politics students are able to develop a critical awareness of contemporary issues and their historical origins. Students will develop an ability to discuss and debate issues using a broad philosophical and ethical base that will be much valued in their future careers.

University courses:

  • Law
  • International Relations
  • History/Politics
  • Social Sciences
  • Accountancy and Finance

Future careers:

  • Law
  • Journalism
  • Teaching
  • Civil Service
  • Accountancy and Management Consultancy

Curriculum Intent

What is Greenford High School aiming to achieve through its Government & Politics curriculum?

  • To expand students’ understanding of the institutions of government and the interaction of the executive, legislative and judiciary. To develop an understanding and interest in political parties, voting and political participation including the values that support liberal democratic values in this country including the rule of law and protection of civil liberties.
  • To develop independent thinking to expand students’ intellectual horizons and to enable them to engage critically with the world around them, by engaging with a range of contemporary political issues including issues affecting global order.
  • To enable high standards of academic achievement through the sequencing of the A-Level Politics course and quality first teaching to empower students to progress to university.
  • To expand students’ opportunities to engage with political issues so that they develop their sense of moral responsibility.
  • To develop students’ knowledge and understanding of political topics, concepts, theory and methods.
  • To explore political issues by using a range of evidence and different theoretical perspectives including key political thinkers and philosophers.
  • To be able to identify, analyse and evaluate different interpretations approaches and debates within Politics.
  • To develop students’ essay writing so that they can communicate effectively in the exam and using a structure that will secure them the best possible outcomes.
  • To ensure that students are equipped to deal with the demands of the exam (AO1, AO2 and AO3) as well as understanding how they will be assessed.
  • To develop students communication and advocacy through effective questioning, debates and other in-lesson quality-talk opportunities.
  • To provide students with ample opportunity to practice exam questions and receive feedback to ensure progress in their political knowledge and understanding as well as application, analysis and evaluation skills.
  • To give students structured resources to use in their independent learning to teach them how to work effectively independently, such as, the revision cycle based on research on memory.
  • To prepare students for university through activities that promote intellectual curiosity, such as extended reading, as well as equipping them with the necessary skills, such as effective note-taking and revision.

History

Why choose a level history at post 16?

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Entry Requirements

Grade 6+ in History GCSE.

Course Content

Level: GCE A Level
Awarding Body: Edexcel

History enables students to learn about and understand the past - and, through it, come to a far better understanding of the present. History is exciting and interesting, but also offers students the opportunity to acquire and improve on many of the key skills which have been identified as a priority for Higher Education. History trains students to effectively communicate complex ideas, the ability to research, analyse and evaluate information, both orally and in writing, and the capacity to make substantiated judgments, all whilst developing independent work skills.

Paper 1: Breadth study with interpretations - Britain, 162-1701: conflict, revolution and settlement.
Paper 2: Depth Study – Russia in revolution, 1894-1924.
Paper 3: Themes in breadth with aspects in depth – Germany, 1871-1990: united, divided and reunited.
Coursework: 20% of the A Level is based on an independently researched enquiry on historical interpretations of the Russian Revolution.

Assessment

3 papers (30 %, 30% and 20%) and coursework on the Russian Revolution (20%).

Progression Routes

Students can go to university with an A Level in History. History is good preparation for jobs including Law, Journalism, Banking, The Civil Service, Business, Accounting and Teaching. History is highly valued by universities, in particular by the Russell Group. It is viewed as a traditional and academically rigorous course that provides students with a wide range of transferable skills.

University courses:

  • Law
  • History
  • Social Sciences
  • Accountancy and Finances
  • Journalism/Film Studies

Future careers:

  • Law
  • Teaching
  • Journalism
  • Retail and Finance
  • Civil Service

Curriculum Intent

What is Greenford High School aiming to achieve through its History curriculum?

  • To enable students to develop and extend their knowledge and understanding of specified key events, periods and societies in local, British, and wider world history; and of the wide diversity of human experience.
  • To allow students to gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts.
  • To engage students in historical enquiry to develop as independent learners and as critical and reflective thinkers.
  • To develop students’ ability to ask relevant questions about the past. 
  • To enable students to engage directly with questions and present independent opinions about them in arguments that are well-written, clearly expressed, coherently organised and effectively supported by relevant evidence. 
  • To develop students’ communication and advocacy through effective questioning, debates and other in-lesson quality-talk opportunities.
  • To encourage students to investigate issues critically and to make valid historical claims by using a range of sources in their historical context. 
  • To ensure students are able to identify, analyse and evaluate different interpretations, approaches and debates within History.
  • To give students power over their own knowledge allowing them to evaluate critically the significance and utility of a large body of material, including evidence from contemporary sources and interpretations of historians. 
  • To allow students to gain the confidence to undertake self-directed learning, making the most effective use of time and resources, and increasingly defining one's own questions and goals.
  • To develop students’ essay writing so that they can communicate effectively in the exam and using a structure that will secure them the best possible outcomes.
  • To ensure that students are equipped to deal with the demands of the exams in KS4 and 5 as well as understanding how they will be assessed.
  • To provide students with ample opportunity to practice exam questions and receive feedback to ensure progress in their political knowledge and understanding as well as application, analysis and evaluation skills.
  • To give students structured resources to use in their independent learning to teach them how to work effectively independently, such as, the revision cycle based on research on memory.
  • To prepare students for university through activities that promote intellectual curiosity, such as extended reading, as well as equipping them with the necessary skills, such as effective note-taking and revision.

Mathematics

Why choose A Level Mathematics at Post 16?

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Entry Requirements

Grade 6+ in Maths GCSE and a pass on our internal entrance exam.

Course Content

Level: GCE A Level
Awarding Body: Edexcel

A Level Mathematics will extend and deepen your knowledge of various areas of Mathematics, some of which you will have covered at GCSE, and some of which will be brand new. Some areas you will have the opportunity to study are finding the gradients of curves and areas under curves - possibly one of the most important discoveries in mathematics of the last millennia; motion and forces - why do things move the way they do? How do we know a bridge won’t fall down? Probability and statistics - how do we know if two things have a relationship or not?

  • Year 12: Pure, Mechanics and Statistics
  • Year 13: Pure, Mechanics and Statistics

The course is divided into three parts. The largest is Pure Mathematics, which covers two of the three papers you will be examined on at the end of Year 13. In this part of the course, you will extend some familiar topics such as Trigonometry and Functions, while learning completely new ones such as Calculus. The other two parts are Statistics and Mechanics, which cover the content for the third paper.

Assessment

As a two year course, all content will be assessed at the end of year 13. 

  • Paper 1: Pure Mathematics (33.3% of total A Level)
  • Paper 2: Pure Mathematics (33.3% of total A Level)
  • Paper 3: Statistics and Mechanics (33.3% of total A Level)

Progression Routes

Mathematics is one of the most highly sought-after A Levels, and possibly the best ‘facilitating’ subject. It would be useful for anyone who wants to go into any of the following fields: mathematics, science, engineering, computer science, economics, business, accounting, management, medicine, dentistry, technology.

Curriculum Intent 

What is Greenford High School aiming to achieve through its Mathematics curriculum?

  • To develop a passion for mathematics for students to continue throughout their school life and beyond, whilst building curiosity about the mathematics around us and ask about ‘why’ and ‘how’ concepts arise.
  • To reason mathematically through lines of enquiry, conjecturing relationships and generalisations, developing arguments through justifications and proof using mathematical language.
  • To become fluent with the fundamentals of mathematics, through varied, frequent practice and increasingly complex concepts over time, so that students can develop conceptual understanding and the ability to recall and apply knowledge rapidly and accurately.
  • To be able to problem solve by applying mathematics to a variety of routine and non-routine problems, with increasing sophistication. Breaking down problems into a series of simpler steps and persevering in seeking solutions in order to promote independence, resilience and perseverance through rich-tasks. 
  • To build on the mathematics that has been taught previously to enable students to master key skills and make rapid progress.
  • To be inclusive and meet all students’ needs to ensure that all learners are able to access the curriculum and achieve,  but also to challenge and engage the most able students, encouraging them to study Maths and related courses beyond GCSE and A Level , at University and through their career ambitions.
  • To be able to be self-sufficient in managing their personal finances beyond secondary school.
  • To develop teamwork and leadership skills through ‘Maths talk’.
  • To foster a culture where the most able students act as mentors for younger students encouraging a real sense of a Maths community in school.
  • To cultivate an enthusiasm for Maths, and develop application skills, through relevant and related trips and extra-curricular activities.

Media Studies

Why choose Media at Post 16?

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Entry Requirements

Grade 5+ in Media Studies GCSE or Grade 6+ in either English Language or English Literature GCSEs.

Course Content

Level: GCE A Level
Awarding Body: AQA

Media Studies is a popular option at A Level and attracts well-motivated students who are interested in the mass media - television, film, advertising, newspapers and the internet/digital communications. The course aims to develop media literacy and students' capacity to communicate this understanding via media technology and in the written form. There is no need to have studied Media at GCSE and students are taught everything they need for the A Level over the two year course. 

Year 1: 

Year 2: 

The exam and coursework topics encourage students to engage with relevant media issues and debates as well as media products of cultural and historical significance. Students will also gain an excellent understanding of theoretical perspectives in media and cultural studies that will provide the perfect platform for future study at degree level.

Assessment

Exams (70%): There are two examinations at the end of the course, both two hours and both worth 35% of the overall A Level. Both exams focus on the Close Study Products (CSPs) that make up the majority of the course. These are essentially set texts and collectively meet the subject content requirements covering the nine different media forms, historical contexts and products for an international audience.

Coursework (30%): Students will create one cross-media production in the second year of the course. The annually changing briefs will give students the opportunity to create bold and innovative work using the latest in media technology.

Progression Routes

Knowledge of the media is increasingly valued and an important aspect of work in most institutions in our information-led society. This course will also help develop research and communication skills and provides the building blocks essential for any university course. The dual nature of A Level Media encompasses both practical and academic skills and means former students have progressed to theoretical degrees such as Film Studies and Literature at the University of St Andrews and practical filmmaking courses at UAL and Ravensbourne Film School.

Media Studies naturally leads to careers in the creative industries such as film and TV production, journalism, marketing, advertising or public relations. However, an awareness of how the world of media works will undoubtedly support other careers such as social work, law, medicine and education. By knowing how the media operates in our society, future generations will be able to decode messages more skilfully and engage with topics that are compelling aspects of tomorrow’s world.

Curriculum intent

What is Greenford High School trying to achieve through our Media curriculum?

Philosophy, Ethics & Religion

Why choose a level RE at post 16?

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Entry Requirements

Grade 5+ in History, Geography or RE GCSE.

Course Content

Level: GCE A Level
Awarding Body: AQA

The course is a thought provoking subject and will enable students to develop insights into areas of knowledge, belief and thought central to an understanding of the modern world. Through a study of philosophy, ethics and Christianity, students will be equipped with a range of knowledge and skills which will help them to make sense of contemporary events and issues. Students will also gain critical and evaluative skills sought after by higher education institutions and employers.

Unit 1: Philosophy of religion and ethics (50% of A Level)

Section A: Philosophy of Religion

  • Arguments for the Existence of God
  • Evil and Suffering
  • Religious Experience
  • Religious Language
  • Miracles
  • Self and Life after Death

Section B: Ethics and Religion

  • Ethical Theories
  • Issues of Human Life and Death
  • Issues of Animal Life and Death
  • Introduction to Meta Ethics
  • Free Will and Moral Responsibility
  • Conscience
  • Bentham and Kant

Unit 2: Study of religion and dialogues – Christianity (50% of A Level)

Section A: Study of Religion (Christianity)

  • Sources of Wisdom and Authority
  • God/Gods/Ultimate Reality
  • Self, Death and the Afterlife
  • Good Conduct and Key Moral Principles
  • Expression of Religious Identity
  • Religion, Gender and Sexuality
  • Religion and Science
  • Religion and Secularisation
  • Religion and Religious Pluralism

Section B: The dialogue between Philosophy of Religion and Religion.

Section C: The dialogue between Ethical Studies and Religion.

ASSESSMENT

The course is assessed at the end of Year 13 by two 3 hour examinations.

Progression Routes

Studying philosophy, religion and ethics equips students with strong literacy, oracy and analytical skills that enable them to succeed in a variety of different university courses and eventual careers. 

Potential degree options for those studying philosophy, religion and ethics could include: 

Careers stemming from the study of Philosophy, Religion and Ethics could include:

Curriculum intent

What is Greenford High School aiming to achieve through its Philosophy, Ethics and Religion curriculum?

Physics

Why choose A Level Physics at Post 16?

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Entry Requirements

Grade 6+ in Science (separate or combined) &  Grade 6+ in Maths GCSE.

Course Content

Level: GCE A Level
Awarding Body: AQA 7408

The A Level Physics course covers a range of key concepts in Physics, including particle physics, electricity, mechanics, waves, materials and fields. In Year 2 there is also the option of taking a unit in astrophysics. Approximately 50% of the course is based on mathematics, whilst the other 50% describes the ways in which this mathematics can be applied to real life situations. It is therefore essential that students take A Level Mathematics if they wish to study Physics.

The aims of these specifications are to encourage candidates to:

Year 1 

 
Year 2

Assessment

The common practical assessment criteria is applied continually throughout the two years to allow students to develop the confidence in practical skills. This is assessed in house by teachers and is assigned on the final certificate as a Pass or Fail. (99.9% of national students pass this assessment).

The final year 13 assessment is in the format of three papers. Each paper is 2 hours long and roughly contribute 33.3% of the total grade each. The first 2 papers have a mix of 60 marks of short and long answers with a 25 mark multiple choice section. The third paper assesses 45 marks worth of practical and data analysis with a 35 mark section on the engineering physics option.

Progression Routes

This course will prepare students to progress into higher education, to follow any courses in the world of Engineering, one of the other sciences or related subjects, or to enter employment where a knowledge of Physics would be useful. Physics is one of the most sought after A levels by universities and employers, it opens many doors and closes none.

University courses:

Future careers:

Curriculum Intent

What is Greenford High aiming to achieve through its Science curriculum?

At Greenford High School the Science curriculum is designed to foster a curiosity about the world around us, enable citizens of the future to understand and explore the world effectively and to be able to use scientific principles to both answer and ask questions about the universe and everything in it.

Our intent is that our curriculum:

Psychology

Why choose A Level Psychology at post 16?

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Entry Requirements

Grade 5+ in English, Maths and Science (separate or combined) GCSEs.

Course Content

Level: GCE A Level
Awarding Body: AQA

Psychology A Level at Greenford High School has been designed to provide a broad introduction to the scope and nature of Psychology as a science.

We follow the AQA (A) exam board. The emphasis is on applying knowledge and understanding rather than just acquiring knowledge, thereby developing analysis, evaluation and critical thinking skills. It is therefore essential that you are confident with science based subjects, as well as English language to help you with extended pieces of writing. As research methods is a large part of A Level Psychology you also need be competent and confident in Mathematics.

Year 1

When you study Psychology at GHS the emphasis is on applying knowledge and understanding rather than just acquiring knowledge. This will develop your skills of analysis, evaluation and critical thinking. In Year 12, the specification offers a broad range of topics, including memory, attachment, research methods, approaches, biopsychology, social influence, and abnormality.

Year 2

In Year 13, there are a range of topic-based options which bring together explanations from different approaches to psychology and engage students in issues and debates in contemporary psychology. If you progress on to Year 13 you will study topics including relationships, aggression, as well as issue and debates, schizophrenia and research methods.

Psychology can be successfully combined with most other subjects.

Assessment

As the A Level is linear you will be studying Psychology over two years and sit your final exams at the end of the two years. In years 12 and 13 there are a range of topic-based options which bring together explanations from different approaches and engage students in issues and debates in contemporary psychology. These include topics such as Memory, Attachment, Aggression and Schizophrenia. At the end of Year 12 you will sit examinations to ensure you are able to progress into Year 13.

This linear two year course offers a broad introduction to the scope and nature of psychology as a science.

Progression Routes

In addition to the obvious progression on to degree courses in Psychology, a good A Level grade in this subject will be accepted as part of the qualification for the vast majority of degree courses.

Universities and employers view qualifications in Psychology very favourably as this indicates good communication skills and confidence, which are important to any career.

Curriculum Intent

What is Greenford High School aiming to achieve through its Psychology curriculum?

Sociology

Why choose sociology at Post 16?

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Entry requirements

Grade 5+ in English and History GCSEs. Preference will be given to students with grade 6+ in English and History GCSEs.

Course Content

Level: GCE A Level
Awarding Body: AQA

A Level Sociology is a fascinating way to understand the world around you and your place within it! As a student of Sociology, you will begin to develop a critical approach and will always ask questions based on the evidence presented to you. Sociology also allows you the opportunity to explore significant social theories such as Marxism, Feminism, Functionalism and Post-modernism and will use these ideas to debate the reality of the social world. Key Sociological questions that you will focus on in your studies include:

Through your study of Sociology you will learn to:

Course content Year 1

Course content Year 2

Assessment

There is no coursework. There are three examinations which are two hours long each. Each paper mainly comprises extended writing/essay questions.

Progression Routes

There are many degrees and careers open to students of Sociology including social science degrees; law; journalism; criminology; management and administration; leisure, travel and tourism; education, professional and social services; business and finance.

University courses:

Future careers: 

Curriculum Intent

What is Greenford High School aiming to achieve through its Sociology curriculum?

Spanish

Why choose a level Spanish at post 16?

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Entry Requirements

Grade 6+ in Spanish GCSE.

Course Content

Level: GCE A Level
Awarding Body: Edexcel

Students will learn to discuss a range of topics in the language they are studying. These will include Social Issues and Trends, Political and Artistic Culture as well as an in depth study of a film and a book. Students will have access to a wide-range of authentic materials such as video, online resources, newspapers and magazines and have the opportunity to take part in weekly conversation sessions with a Foreign Language Assistant.

The main focus is on developing the knowledge and skills acquired at GCSE, encouraging accuracy through a solid understanding of grammar and gaining a useful insight into the culture of the target language country. Speaking skills are developed in lessons and in sessions with the language assistant. Through the topics studied, students will get the opportunity to reflect on various aspects of contemporary society including the changing role of the family, equal rights, life for the marginalised, cultural heritage, politics and immigration. All students will be given the chance to take part in a week's work experience in a country where the language is spoken.

Assessment

A Level Spanish is a two year linear course with exams at the end of Year 13. 

Progression Routes

By choosing to study a foreign language at A Level, you immediately enhance your UCAS and employment prospects. It is an extremely flexible subject which combines well with both Arts, Sciences and Business based subjects. Most universities offer courses that allow you to combine the study of a language alongside a wide variety of other subjects and most of these courses will offer the opportunity for a year abroad studying or working. In its guidance to applicants, Russell Group universities recommend languages as a 'facilitating' subject at A Level because choosing languages "leaves open a wide range of options for university studies".

Curriculum Intent

What is Greenford High School aiming to achieve through its Spanish curriculum?

BTEC Level 3

BTEC Diploma in Business

Why choose BTEC Diploma in Business at Post 16?

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Entry Requirements

Grade 4+ in English & Maths GCSE.

It is a requirement to have a minimum of grade 5 in Maths and English Language due to the external assessments. However, we may consider students who have a grade 4 if other entry requirements are met.

Course Content

Level: BTEC Level 3
Awarding Body: Edexcel

If you have an interest in business but not yet sure of your exact career direction, the BTEC Business course could be ideal for you. It gives you the opportunity to study a wide variety of business disciplines such as finance, law, marketing, human resource management, business decision methods and the business environment. This exciting course has been designed to prepare individuals for employment and/or career development opportunities. The course investigates different types of business activities, what they are trying to achieve and what others expect of the business. You will also look at managing money and will also investigate setting up a new business and effective customer services.

This course allows students to receive specialist work-related qualifications in Business. Students have the opportunity to develop the knowledge, understanding and skills of people in employment and develop key skills in a business context, such as improving performance, problem solving and working with others. Through this course, students can prepare for employment or to progress onto a university course.

Year 1

Year 2

Assessment

The internal assessment will be approximately 60% and the external assessment will be approximately 40%.

Progression Routes

The majority of students have gone on to university to pursue a range of business-related courses including business management, accountancy, finance, law, management and marketing.

Other students have progressed on to apprenticeships in business, accountancy or finance.

Curriculum Intent

What is Greenford High School aiming to achieve through its Business and Economics curriculum?

BTEC Extended Diploma in Business

Why choose BTEC Extended Diploma in Business at Post 16?

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Entry Requirements

Grade 4+ in English & Maths GCSE.

Due to the external assessments a minimum of grade 5 in Maths and English Language is required. However, we may consider students with a grade 4 in certain cases if the other entry requirements are met.

Course Content

Level: BTEC Level 3
Awarding Body: Edexcel

This course will allow you to get the equivalent of three A Levels in Business Studies. This means your timetable will be purely Business, so a passion for the subject is essential!

If you have an interest in business but not yet sure of your exact career direction, the BTEC Business course could be ideal for you. It gives you the opportunity to study a wide variety of business disciplines such as finance, law, marketing, human resource management, business decision methods and the business environment. This exciting course has been designed to prepare individuals for employment and/or career development opportunities. The course investigates different types of business activities, what they are trying to achieve and what others expect of the business. You will also look at managing money and will also investigate setting up a new business and effective customer services. 

This course allows students to receive specialist work-related qualifications in Business, through classroom and visit based assignments, designed to support the 12 coursework units. Students have the opportunity to develop the knowledge, understanding and skills of people in employment and develop major key skills in a business context, such as improving own performance, problem solving and working with others. Through this course, students can prepare for employment or to progress onto a university course.

Year 1

Year 2

Assessment

The internal assessment will be approximately 60% and the external assessment will be approximately 40%.

Progression Routes

The majority of students go on to university to pursue a range of business related courses including business management, accountancy, finance, law, management and marketing.

Other students have progressed onto apprenticeships in business, accountancy or finance.

Curriculum Intent

What is Greenford High School aiming to achieve through its Business and Economics curriculum?

BTEC Extended Diploma in Applied Science

Why choose BTEC Extended Diploma in Applied Science at Post 16?

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Entry Requirements

Grade 4+ in Maths & English, at least one grade 5 in any Science.

Course Content

Level: BTEC Level 3
Awarding Body: Edexcel

The BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma in Applied Science has become an ever more rigorous qualification with many universities, employers and apprenticeship suppliers accepting it as an entry qualification equivalent to 3 A-levels. It prepares students for many roles in the science sector, for example as a technician in the areas of a laboratory or industrial science. This qualification can also be used to progress onto Higher Education Institutions to study science related degree courses such as Forensic Science, Biomedical Science, Optometry, Radiography or Nursing to name but a few. The assessment is mainly based on coursework with one Exam and one externally assessed Task in each year. Delivery of the course will be through the use of a mixture of theory and practical work.

The course is assessed with a mixture of exams, internally assessed coursework units and externally assessed task based units.

The four externally assessed units include:

Three core coursework based units:

Together with 6 other subject specific coursework units:

The BTEC Nationals in Applied Science are a suite of qualifications that reflect aspects of employment within science organisations or organisations that use science and enable learners to develop practical scientific skills. These qualifications will appeal to learners who prefer portfolio-based assessment covering a variety of scientific investigations. During the course students will develop key skills in communication, numeracy and ICT, as well as time-management and organisation. This provides invaluable experience for students who go onto full-time work, as well as university or apprenticeships.

Assessment

13 units of which 7 are mandatory and 4 are external. Mandatory content (67%). External assessment (42%).

Progression Routes

The BTEC Nationals in Applied Science could lead to many different opportunities in education and employment including:

Work in Science based industry could include:

Curriculum Intent

What is Greenford High aiming to achieve through its Science curriculum?

At Greenford High School the Science curriculum is designed to foster a curiosity about the world around us, enable citizens of the future to understand and explore the world effectively and to be able to use scientific principles to both answer and ask questions about the universe and everything in it.

Our intent is that our curriculum:

BTEC Level 3 Extended Certificate in Sport

Why choose BTEC Sport at Post 16?

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Entry Requirements

Grade 4+ in English & Maths GCSE.

Course Content

Level: BTEC Level 3
Awarding Body: Edexcel

BTEC National Extended certificate in Sport will give you an insight into how the body systems work and how they are influential in sports performances. You will study units on how nutrition is imperative for athletes and investigate the key concept surrounding energy intake and expenditure. This is a coursework and exam-based subject that incorporates sessions in and outside of the classroom. BTEC National Award in Sport provides a sound framework for further education in numerous fields not only sporting avenues.

Sport is an important part of our lives and the BTEC National focuses on a variety of areas.

Assessment

Progression Routes

The qualification carries UCAS points and is recognised by higher education providers as contributing to meeting admission requirements for many courses if taken alongside other qualifications as part of a two-year programme of study. It combines well with a large number of subjects and supports entry to higher education courses in a very wide range of disciplines (depending on the subjects taken alongside).

Many students go on to study Sports Science degree courses, either as a single or a joint course.

For learners who wish to study an aspect of sport in higher education, opportunities include:

Future careers:

Curriculum Intent

What is Greenford High School aiming to achieve through its Physical Education curriculum?

BTEC Level 3 Extended Certificate in IT

Why choose BTEC Extended Certificate in IT at Post 16?

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Entry Requirements

Grade 4+ in English & Maths GCSE.

Course Content

Level: BTEC Level 3
Awarding Body: Edexcel

The Extended Certificate in Information Technology is a two-year course leading to a qualification the equivalent of one A Level. BTEC Level 3 National in IT is an excellent grounding to go onto further study in an IT-related subject or to seek an apprenticeship or employment. The vocational nature of this course means that there is emphasis on developing practical skills in key areas of IT/Computing. 

The course is designed for learners who are interested in an introduction to the study of creating IT systems to manage and share information, alongside other fields of study, with a view to progressing to a wide range of higher education courses, not necessarily in IT. You will develop a common core of IT knowledge and study areas such as the relationship between hardware and software that form an IT system, managing and processing data to support business and using IT to communicate and share information.

Year 1

Unit 1: Information Technology Systems - This unit will give you a fundamental and synoptic understanding of all areas of IT, supporting your progression to an IT-related higher education course.

Unit 3: Using Social Media in Business 

Year 2

Unit 2: Creating Systems to Manage Information - The skills you gain in this unit support progression to IT-related higher education courses and to employment in a role that requires computing-related expertise.

Unit 6: Website Development 

Assessment

Unit 1: Information Technology Systems (synoptic)  - 33.3%  - Exam based
Unit 2: Creating Systems to Manage Information - 25%  -  Exam based
Unit 3: Using Social Media in Business - 25% - Coursework
Unit 6: Website Development - 16.7% - Coursework

Progression Routes

Achievement of this qualification can support students to go on and study relevant IT degrees in a Higher Education institution. It could also allow you to tailor your learning to a specific area in the IT sector, to prepare you for employment or to move onto an apprenticeship programme in that area.

University courses:

Future careers:

Curriculum Intent

What is Greenford High School aiming to achieve through its Computing and Information Technology curriculum?

btec Level 3 Extended Diploma in Health & Social Care

Why choose Health and Social Care at Post 16?

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Entry Requirements

Grade 4+ in English & Maths GCSE

Course Content

Level: BTEC Level 3
Awarding Body: AQA

The course is for those who have an interest in health, early years care and education, social care and issues affecting the care sector. It is particularly suitable for those who have decided that they wish to enter a particular area of work, such as nursing, teaching, social work and other related professions.

The course is a broad-based vocational qualification designed to allow flexible progression routes, moving on to advanced level studies or further training and/or employment. The course is assessed through exams and coursework. There are a range of mandatory units, as well as optional units of study.

Year 1:

Year 2:

Assessment

Four units are externally assessed (approx. 40% of the course).  The rest of the units are internally assessed through coursework. 

Progression Routes

Successful candidates can progress on to degree-related courses such as nursing, social work or health, social care or early years related apprenticeships.

University courses:

Future careers: